2019 Research Project

Reducing motorcyclist injuries: Engaging stakeholders to apply evidence-based countermeasures

Principal Investigator
Jerry Everett
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
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Co-Principal Investigator
Asad Khattak
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
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Summary

When involved in a crash, riders of motorcycles lack the protection featured in an enclosed vehicle and are thus more likely to sustain injuries, including fatal ones. When controlled for exposure (per mile traveled in 2015), the number of motorcycle fatalities is nearly 29 times the number of passenger vehicle fatalities. After developing a deeper understanding of the nature of the rider injuries, using the Motorcycle Crash Causation Study (MCCS) data, and building on motorcycle research activities and momentum (CSCRS project R20), this project will identify countermeasures, which can reduce injuries in motorcycle crashes.

The project will enable evidence-based practice, shorten the research to practice cycle and focus on assisting stakeholders with diverse backgrounds, motorcycle safety practitioners and advocates in applying the outcomes of research. Through all of this, the project will shorten the research to implementation cycle. The project will further shed light on risk-taking behaviors of motorcyclists that relate to injuries sustained by “different body parts” of the rider. More specific project aims are to:

  • enable evidence-based motorcycle safety practices by helping diverse stakeholders apply actionable research outcomes with a safe systems approach;
  • synthesize the contribution of key risk factors and helmet-specific attributes in crash occurrence and injuries to different body parts of the motorcyclists; and
  • identify countermeasures, including new technologies, which can reduce injuries, especially to different parts of the body in a crash.

Project Details

Project Type: Research
Project Status: Active
Start Date: 8-1-2019
End Date: 7-31-2020
Contract Year: Year 3
Total Funding from CSCRS: $50, 349